A Thank You to those that Love Someone with Anxiety.

To those of you married to someone with an anxiety disorder, the parents, the siblings, the friends supporting people with a mental illness: this is for you.

I think it takes a special kind of person to love someone with anxiety, unconditionally.

As someone that has anxiety, I know just how much patience it takes to deal with loving me. It takes understanding, and a kind heart.

If you are loving someone through their mental illness, you are more of a hero than you know. Every hug, late night talk, and reassuring smile makes us feel a little more normal again.

To those of you that sit in silence with us when we can’t find the words: you are speaking volumes.

To those of you that treat us like a normal human being, because that’s what we are: you make us feel sane.

To those of you that take the time to actually listen when we just need an ear: you’re helping us to get our emotions and feelings off our chests.

Living with a mental illness can be frustrating, challenging, lonely, and sometimes unbearable. But, having at least one person that knows just what to do, can make a huge difference in our lives.

You may not understand why we are the way we are, but you love us anyway. And, that is impressive. You will probably get aggravated with us. (Hell, we get aggravated with ourselves!) But, you don’t leave. You always stick by us. And, that is impressive. You show us compassion, even on the days we don’t want it. And, that is impressive.

YOU are impressive.

Find me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/theanxiousphotog

Follow me on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/paige_butler_

Why Treating Yourself is Important

Treating yourself is essential for good mental health.

I’m not talking about spending $1,000 at your local makeup store, or buying $20 bath bombs. (But if that’s what you want to do, go for it!) I’m talking about taking fifteen minutes out of your day.

“But, fifteen minutes isn’t enough time to do anything.” FALSE.

Here are five things you can do each day in fifteen minutes or less to help relieve stress and improve mental health:

1. Meditate or pray.

Taking 15 minutes of silence can do a lot more than you would think. Spend time with yourself, and your thoughts. Pray for your needs. Concentrate, and just breathe.

2. Take a bath.

(If you’re not a bath person, showers are fine, too.) Make sure to use all your smell good bath products and essential oils. Putting some Lavendar in your bath is great for relaxation.

3. Do Yoga.

You don’t have to be experienced to do a Yoga routine. There are plenty of beginner videos that are great on YouTube. If you aren’t into Yoga, just take some time to stretch your muscles and relax your body.

4. Listen to music.

Music is a big part of my life. It doesn’t matter what mood I’m in, I always want to listen to music. It’s so therapeutic. I have different playlists for my different moods. It ranges from Broadway to alternative rock, and everything in between.

5. Go outside.

Fresh air and sunshine can make a big difference in your mood. Go for a walk around the block, or just soak up the sun on your deck. Take in that Vitamin D!

A lot of people think they can’t take care of themselves because they don’t have the time or money. But, it is so important to take that small amount of time out of your day to take care of yourself. You only get one body, and one mind. Make sure you treat it right!

Find me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/theanxiousphotog

Follow me on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/paige_butler_


So many people suffer from Anxiety Disorder. It’s time to speak up about it and start telling our stories! 

To those that don’t struggle with this disorder, it can be hard to understand. Sometimes verbally explaining it, just doesn’t get the point across. And, I get it. It IS hard to understand. I have it, and don’t even understand it sometimes. 

People that don’t get it, may say things like:

“Just pull yourself together.” 

“Get over it.”

“It can’t be that bad.”

Or my personal favorite: “But, you don’t LOOK sick.” 

I don’t think this comes from a bad place. But, this is common. I do think there needs to be more awareness around the subject. A light needs to be shed. We need to be able to talk about it without feeling ashamed or embarrassed. We need to make people understand. 

Anxiety is so much more than having your random panic attack once in a while. It’s a daily struggle. 

You feel as if you’re drowning…


Unable to sleep…

You have dark thoughts…


You can’t breathe…

And, you can’t escape it…

This really doesn’t even scratch the surface. But, it does show a small portion of the daily struggles felt by someone suffering with Anxiety Disorder. 

If you have anxiety: 

Do not be afraid to talk about it. Do not feel ashamed. Do not be embarrassed to ask for help. Your story matters.

If you don’t have anxiety:

Please try to understand that even though we don’t look sick on the outside, doesn’t mean we aren’t struggling. Don’t be quick to judge. 
#endthestigma #speakup

Find me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/theanxiousphotographer

Follow me on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/paige_butler_ 
Photo credit: Shutterflies Photography

Model: Natalie Fiore

Be an Overcomer.

I sometimes care too much what other people may think, because my mind has convinced me I’m being judged. 

I have had thoughts so bad, and so dark, I won’t say them out loud. 

I have locked myself in my house for days on end. 

I have believed my brain when it told me I was crazy. I was useless. 

I have cried. I’ve screamed. I’ve been silent because my mind told me I couldn’t talk to anyone. They wouldn’t understand.

My brain can be a dark place because of my anxiety. When people ask, “what does anxiety feel like?” I tell them it’s like having a constant all out war inside my own mind. It’s chaos. It’s having 278373 tabs open on your computer, and not being able to close any of them. It’s straight fear. 

Some days, I look back at the hell my own brain has put me through, and I can only thank God I’ve made it this far. I am not going to lie to you and tell you I’ve never had a suicidal thought. I have. I’ve had them more times than I care to admit. And, everytime the thought crossed my mind, I’d pray. 

I’m also not going to lie to you and tell you I’ve got my crap together, now. I don’t.  But, I do have perspective. I have faith. Faith in God, faith in medication, faith in myself. It’s the reason I wake up everyday.

 I am so thankful for my life. I consider myself to be quite blessed. I won’t let my disorder steal my joy away from me. It cannot take my life. 


Find me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/theanxiousphotographer

Follow me on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/paige_butler_

Anxiety: A Life or Death Disorder

I never wanted to leave the house. 

I couldn’t control the racing thoughts going through my brain.

I slept constantly, because it brought peace.

I distanced myself from friends and family. 


Anxiety isn’t just panic attacks. 

Anxiety is depression. It’s racing thoughts. It’s feeling cut off from the world. It’s always second guessing yourself. It’s feeling like you’re having a heart attack in the middle of the night, out of nowhere. 

There are so many different components to Anxiety Disorder. It doesn’t effect any two people the same. 

You can’t always see anxiety on the outside. It’s an inward battle that takes over a person’s life. It takes ahold of your brain, and doesn’t let go. 


Definition of Anxiety Disorder: A group of mental disorders characterized by significant feelings of anxiety or fear. 

That’s a pretty broad definition. It says nothing about what causes it, where it comes from, or why it’s even a thing.

Why? Because, it’s different for everyone. It can be caused because of a person’s environment, an event that caused P.T.S.D., or even a chemical imbalance in the brain. It can manifest in a huge variety of different ways. 

Some people develop O.C.D. 

Some people have irrational fears. (i.e.: the dark, being sick, certain animals, or even leaving the house)

Some people have anxiety/panic attacks. Those come in a thousand different forms. 




Here comes the important part: 

Most people living with Anxiety Disorder are too afraid or ashamed to talk about it. That means they won’t ask for help. People living with Anxiety are at an increased risk for suicide, because they never got the help they needed. Insurance doesn’t always cover mental disorder care. It can be lonely and terrifying. 

large (1).jpg

If someone you care about tells you they’re suffering from Anxiety or Depression, PLEASE do not dismiss them. 

Sometimes it’s a matter of life and death. 


Find me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/theanxiousphotog

Follow me on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/paige_butler_

The Ugly Parts of Anxiety… 

I’m not going to lie to you, it’s an ugly night. I’m fighting, but anxiety is currently winning this round. I hate go say that, because I try to keep this blog inspirational and upbeat. I almost decided not to write this. But, this is living with Anxiety. This is what it’s like to be me. I said I was going to be open about my disorder, so here it is: 

Tonight is one of those nights that I literally feel like my anxiety is ripping me apart. I can barely think. My mind is spinning. I feel dizzy, sad, scared, hot, and wired. 

Honestly, I feel so many emotions, I couldn’t even pick one that stands out the most. 

My sister, who also suffers from anxiety, is here. I’m trying to hide my panic attack so she doesn’t see. I don’t want to upset her. She’s having a good night. Trust me when I say that hiding a panic attack is so much harder then it sounds. 

I wanted to write this while in the middle of my panic attack, so I can really explain, in detail, what it feels like. But, I can’t think clearly enough to put it into words. I don’t even know what to say. 

At this point, I think I’m just writing to try and get my mind off of it. 

I am exhausted. My body hurts. I feel like I can’t get my breathing under control. My heart is pounding. If you’re wondering, nothing in particular brought it on. I was just laying on my couch. I was fine. And then, I wasn’t. 

I know I’m not alone in this. Chances are that someone reading this is feeling the same way. Just know I feel you. I understand completely. You are far from alone. And, even further from being crazy. 

I’m going to keep telling myself that I am strong. This is a temporary feeling that will soon pass. 

Here’s to a better tomorrow. 

Here’s to being calm and happy. ♡

Photo by: Kari pillow photography. Check her out on FB. 
Find me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/theanxiousphotog

Follow me on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/Paige_butler_

What it Looks like to Struggle with a Mental Disorder

There are so many people that struggle with mental disorders in the U.S. alone. When I say struggle, I mean it. Mental disorders are no joke. They hurt, they make people feel isolated and judged, they cause a constant battle inside a person’s head, and sometimes, they even kill. 

Even though mental disorders cause daily struggles, and can be deadly, you can’t always see them. Some people suffer silently for years. But, just because you can’t see it, doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. Mental disorders are very real, and need to be addressed more often. 

While a person can look totally fine on the outside, they can be fighting an extreme battle on the inside. 

The disorders don’t discriminate. Anyone can be a victim. You’re not always born with it. Some develop in children, and some even wait until you’re an adult to appear. 

Every disorder is different. Each one has it’s own set of signs to look out for. 

If you know someone showing signs of a disorder, don’t be afraid. Don’t distance yourself from them or run away. 

Above all, don’t be afraid to love someone with a mental illness. 

There is such a bad stigma that surrounds mental illness. People seem to assume you can’t have one AND be a normal human being at the same time. But, that’s not the case at all. Sure, we have bad days, but we also have good days, too. 

We are people. We’re human beings. 

A note to those of you living with a mental disorder: 

Don’t feel like you can’t be normal. There is no such thing as normal. We are all different. We all have qualities that make us who we are. Being unique is not a bad thing. For so long society has put labels on mental illnesses that have made people judge. 

If you are one of the MILLIONS of Americans diagnosed with a mental disorder like: Depression, Bi-polar Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, OCD, etc… help spread awareness and break the stigma that’s attached to those names. 

So, what does a mental disorder look like? It looks like human beings. It has no face. It has no specific characteristics. It has no one definition. It has a stigma, and it needs to be broken. 

Find me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/theanxiousphotog

Follow me on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/paige_butler_